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Sorsogon wild fruit “hagis” sought by researchers and TV host

Hagis fruit

SORSOGON CITY -– Two groups of visitors with different purposes recently sought a wild fruit locally called hagis. The fruit caught the attention of university researchers and GMA-7 TV Host Jessica Soho who both looked for endemic fruits that are becoming extinct and are found mostly in the Province of Sorsogon.

The GMA-7 Crew was in Sorsogon in March in search for hagis fruit and its tree. Rey Casao, one of GMA’s researchers coordinated with the Assistant Provincial Agriculturist, Dr. Maria Teresa Destura of the Office of the Provincial Agriculturist (OPAg), Sorsogon City. Dr. Destura immediately sent her staff to assist the TV Crew in search for the wild fruit. The group had visited barangays Sawanga, San Lorenzo, and Salvacion, Bacon District for the video shooting of the said tree. They also met Tess Vidar, a resident of Barangay Tigbao in Casiguran who processes hagis fruit into jelly and jam. Tess was requested by Casao to cook her specialty for the crew. Hagis fruit was featured by Jessica Soho Reports on Sunday, March 24, 2013.

Likewise, researchers from the Institute of Plant Breeding (IBP) at the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) visited Sorsogon in February  to get samples, photos, and planting materials of hagis. Dr. Lavernee Gueco and Dr. Michael Biguelme sought out endemic and wild fruits in the province including local varieties of bananas that are almost extinct. They are examining the nutritional, medicinal and economic value of said endemic fruit. In addition to the hagis, they have also studying Catmon, Limon de China, and local species known as limonsito, mabolo, baligang (black berries), bago, anonang, as well as local guyabano and bananas like white saba and ginuyod.

Contributed by Debbie Ferwelo